People Get Ready

[ make levees, not war ]

Archive for the ‘Katrina Dissidents’ Category

Carnival in Washington

Posted by schroeder915 on January 25, 2007

George W. Bush spent half of his time in the State of the Union address defending his plan to send more Americans into the crosshairs of an Iraq civil war, but had not a single word of sympathy, encouragement, or support for New Orleans, Louisiana, and the Gulf Coast, still suffering from the ravages of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and the federal levee engineering disaster which destroyed New Orleans. He narcissistically delights at the thought of himself as a war president. Were it not for 9/11, he’d have been an ineffective, unpopular president (as he is now, but he would have been denied a second term). Let’s remember how little he’s accomplished in the domestic arena other than tax cuts, which pick our childrens’ pockets tomorrow to enrich the super wealthy today. The “war against terrah” has been so grotesquely mismanaged and exploited for other agendas that even as Bush is talking about surging American troop levels in Iraq, the Taliban and Al Qaeda — who really did attack Americans on American soil — are surging again in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The only answer Bush has for the mismanaged occupation of Iraq is more of the same — more troops in the wrong arena for the wrong cause. In a vain attempt to create democracy from the muzzle of a gun — what Bush himself once derided as “nation-building” — Bush is breeding more animosity and more insurgents. He has never fully engaged the international community — the Arab world in particular — in sharing the responsibility for the outcome in Iraq. His sole interest is securing control of the world’s second largest petroleum reserves under Iraq for his oil company friends. Bush’s “coalition of the willing” has always been a farce — a mere shadow of the international support his father achieved. George W. Bush is creating a giant Sunni-Shia Hydra. There may be no good answer to solving that problem, but his effort to stabilize Iraq by killing more Iraqis will only create more insurgents, kill more Iraqis, and kill more Americans. Meanwhile, by ignoring Americans still suffering from the worst federal engineering disaster here at home, a great American city — a great world city — is being destabilized.

More than 200,000 people remain displaced from New Orleans. Their homes sit idle while they wait for insurance, wait for Road Home grants — neither of which are sufficient compensation to rebuild their homes — wait for streets to be repaired, wait for water and sewer lines to be repaired, wait for street lights to be repaired, wait for the criminal justice system to be repaired, wait for schools to be repaired, wait for hospitals to be repaired, wait … wait … wait. Tens of billions of dollars spent on cleanup amounted to nothing after Bush’s friends grabbed the money. When it was all over, all that remained was $8 billion in CDBG grants for homeowners — a sum of money that George W. Bush has been spending in Iraq every four weeks for nearly four years. Meanwhile, a great American city — a great world city — has been allowed to die. Scores of thousands of more Americans across the Gulf Coast remain without hope.

It’s time for a march on Washington. I propose February 24th — the first Saturday after Mardi Gras — a perfect occasion to take the carnival revolution from the streets of New Orleans to streets of Washington. We’ll need trucks and flatbed trailers to load up with soggy, moldy furniture from houses still not gutted a year and a half after the federal levees broke. We’re going to haul the debris to Washington and dump it on Pennsylvania Avenue as a gesture of our contempt for a president who had nothing to say in the most important report he is required to provide to Congress about the well-being of our nation and her citizens. I’m calling on Americans across the nation who care about New Orleans, who care about the Gulf Coast, who care about the lives of American soldiers and their families, who care about the pressing global environmental issues that need to be addressed right now, who care about an eroding middle class, who care about America and the world being created in George W. Bush’s image. Let us Americans, all of us, march on Washington to tell George W. Bush and Congress that we don’t want their war in Iraq any more. Let’s march on Washington to tell George W. Bush and Congress that we won’t stomach the deaths of any more Americans from oil wars; we won’t stomach the deaths of any more Americans from environmental disasters; we won’t stomach the deaths of any more Americans from bloated bureaucracies and engineering failures. We demand honesty. We demand transparency. We demand accountability. We demand real solutions for the coming environmental challenges. We demand coastal restoration, and Category 5 protection from hurricanes and rising sea levels.

We are Americans. We demand an adequate answer from our elected officials when Americans are in need!

americanfleurdelisflag_400p.jpg

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Posted in Category 5 Storm Protection, Coastal Restoration, Failure is not an option, Global Warming, Hurricane Katrina, Iraq, Katrina Dissidents, Louisiana, Most Revolting President Ever, New Orleans, Rebuild New Orleans, Wetlands Restoration, Worst President Ever | 37 Comments »

WORST. PRESIDENT. EVER.

Posted by schroeder915 on January 23, 2007

Not a single mention of New Orleans?

F**ker!!!

Posted in Katrina Dissidents, Worst President Ever | 17 Comments »

From the town that put fun in the word funeral

Posted by schroeder915 on January 23, 2007

Wright Thompson gets it:

As people waited, the craziest thing happened. What started as a funeral turned into a celebration — a celebration not just of a team, but of themselves. The beers they raised were toasts to their own resiliency. Fans screamed. They chanted. They sang that U2 song “The Saints are Coming.”

HT: Jeff, Library Chronicles.

Posted in Katrina Dissidents, New Orleans, The Saints, Worst Mayor Ever, Worst President Ever | Comments Off on From the town that put fun in the word funeral

Louisiana gulag

Posted by schroeder915 on January 22, 2007

belomorkanal.png

Louisiana’s Hurricane Katrina and Rita victims are being punished because we elected a woman to the governor’s office? Having read heckuva-job Brownie’s remarks, and given the better treatment Mississippi has enjoyed from Washington, I now have to wonder how much of our problems are being caused by prejudice against Louisiana? How many Louisiana residents died because the Bush administration thought it would be cute to punish Kathleen Blanco for having the temerity to run for high office as a woman and as a Democrat?

Are women, in the attitude of the Bush administration, second-class citizens? Does that then imply that Louisianians are second-class citizens for putting a woman in the governor’s mansion? God forbid we should have elected the brown-skinned guy. I wonder: what other qualities would the Bush administration choose to define people as second-class American citizens? Speaking French or Spanish perhaps? Being a Democrat, an Independent, a Green, or a Libertarian? Being Catholic or Jewish? Maybe we should start wearing yellow stars like Jews were forced to do in Nazi Germany to designate us as undesirable Louisiana Katrina victims. Maybe we should be assigned to work in re-education gulags.

We are, all of us, Americans — at least until Louisiana secedes!

How about a class-action law suit against the federal government for discriminating against Louisiana residents?

This just adds more evidence to the record of malfeasance and incompetence which screams for a Congressional investigation into the White House response to Hurricane Katrina.

Posted in Impeach Bush, Kathleen Blanco, Katrina Dissidents, Worst President Ever | 3 Comments »

Laissez le Saints rouler

Posted by schroeder915 on January 19, 2007

If the Saints win the Superbowl it’s like Katrina never happened, said Stephen Colbert … and monkey boy gets a pass for his pathetic response over the last year and a half?

Nyaaaah. One thing’s for sure, Bush will have to mention New Orleans for the first time since … since … uh … anyone remember?

colbertsaints.jpg

Library Chronicles’ Jeff tipped me off that Stephen Colbert’s rooting for the Saints over Chicago in the NFC championship game, and why not? The Saints are America’s team (HT: TM, for the link to vote in the poll). Who dat nation is everywhere. This is our year.

saintspoll.jpg

With Sean Payton, Drew Brees, Joe Horn, Reggie Bush, John Carney, Marques Colston, Deuce McAlister, Scott Fujita, and more, plus a little Marie Laveau gris-gris, the Saints are unstoppable:

Gris-Gris is sometimes referred to as the iron fist of Voodoo due to its hammer-like quality of relentless pounding until the spell takes effect. Once a Gris-Gris spell is cast, the momentum slowly builds until it becomes an unstoppable force.

Hey, nothing will please me more than to see da Bears frozen out of the game. As a once-upon-a-time cheesehead and Packers fan, the rivalry never dies.

I can’t wait to see Loki dressed up as a Saintsation (HT: Lisa, The Garden of Irks and Delights).

saintsationloki.jpg

Er … well, maybe I can wait after all.

(By the way, the least I can do for Saintsation Kirsten is to note that as a diabetes patient, she’d like to help Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation find a cure for diabetes.)

Posted in Katrina Dissidents, New Orleans, Sean Payton, The Saints, Worst President Ever | 11 Comments »

The citizens’ revolt continues

Posted by schroeder915 on January 18, 2007

Anytime I write a post about the police chief’s and mayor’s grammar, you know I’m busy. There was much more that I wanted time to write about, and I’ll try to get caught up.

I scanned the radio dial this morning to find out what the redneck wingnut talk show hosts were offering today, and did a double-take when I heard a familiar voice. I’m sitting here now listening the Fox News channel’s lip-smacking convicted insurance commissioner “uh-uh-uh” Jim “smack” Brown’s self-promotion show. He’s interviewing Bart Everson, one week after Bart declared a revolution on the steps of City Hall.

Bart is firing on all cylinders, hitting all the relevant points — if only “uh-uh-uh” Jim “smack” Brown “uh-uh-uh” would shut the eff up (again, we need a true community radio station to broadcast unabridged, free-flowing conversations).

(After the show now) Bart emphasized that he wasn’t advocating for expanded police powers, but Jim Brown cut him off from explaining why — I can relate the story about a friend who was pulled over at a police checkpoint, who may not have been respectful of the police for whatever reason, and who was subsequently issued a traffic ticket — completely illegible because the carbon transfer didn’t work. It’s the second time I’ve heard a story where the citation was illegible — I saw one of those tickets, so I can vouch for their veracity. Unfortunately, traffic stops really do work at catching bad guys, but the rest of us are inconvenienced. Legally, the police have to be careful not to give the appearance of racial profiling, so they’ll issue traffic citations for just about anything. It’s an example of what happens when orders are issued from the lofty heights without surveying the sentiments of residents. The NOPD is making arrests of wanted offenders, but shredding already damaged community relations in the process. We need new thinking. We need more and better dialog to come up with solutions that work, or at least solutions in which the community accepts the tradeoffs — maybe a solution where people who aren’t wanted offenders, and who aren’t driving in a hazardous manner, can be released with a courtesy card instead of a traffic citation. There needs to be a conversation with the community so that we all sign on and understand the consequences.

A Metropolitan Crime Commission poll showed that more than 60 percent of Central City residents don’t feel the police can effectively reduce crime, even though patrols are regularly visible. Bart cited the poll to argue that the police need to be more accountable to communities to solve that problem. For the community policing concept to work, citizens have to be in charge of how policing works for them. There’s a discussion taking place right now at Think New Orleans about creating formal institutions, Citizen Crime Boards, which would require accountability of all of the actors in the criminal justice system to the neighborhoods they serve. If this is a revolution to overthrow incompetent rulers, and to take control of our own destinies, then let’s start with the criminal justice community.

To satisfy his uncontrollable self-aggrandizement, Jim Brown kept interrupting Bart and shifting the conversation, so I felt compelled to call in. Jim Brown dropped the call at first, and I know how fast hosts cut off other speakers, so I felt rushed and couldn’t clearly muster the words I wanted to say. Nevertheless, I got in one good jab at the other participants in the criminal justice system who weren’t mentioned: the judges and District Attorney Eddie Jordan.

I praised Bart’s courage for putting himself in the spotlight to speak out against a broken system even while he’s still mourning a tragic event. I concurred that we need to fix the crime problem, and we need to address all of the forms of violence that are manifested in our society — like denying children a good education, and denying people access to their homes. I said that when the police arrive, it’s already too late. All of the factors which produce criminals are re-manifested by violence perpetrated on the rest of society. We also, however, need to remember that the police are the last line of defense, keeping criminals away from peaceful citizens. Unfortunately, the police are the face of the criminal justice system, and it’s easy to villainize them. Of course, we need to have more and better dialog with the police, but other actors need to participate in the conversation. Police chief Warren Riley answered questions Tuesday night at the NOPD 2nd District community crime meeting (Adrastos has an excellent summary of that event). I said that the judges and D.A. weren’t represented in that conversation, but they need to be. They, too, need to answer to citizens for the broken criminal justice system.

We need to break down the barriers which shelter incompetent and crony-ridden government institutions from citizen anger. We need to create neighborhood entities that foster a dialog, name names, and call into question decisions made by autocratic public officials. Clearly, if there’s anything New Orleans citizens have learned since Hurricane Katrina, it’s that we need to take back control of our government.

Bart closed his interview by reminding listeners that nothing happened after Hurricane Katrina to attack the conditions which breed poverty and crime, despite all of the talk about how our society needs to have a conversation about race and class in our society. This conversation, too, could be hosted by Citizen Crime Boards. The dialog might be spun off into another realm, but Citizen Crime Boards would have the advantage on focusing attention on the end-stream results of the broken social systems which breed violence and return that violence to society by generating criminal behavior.

The local FBI director, Jim Bernazzani, said in an interview yesterday that we have tactical solutions to the crime problem. Those tactical responses to crime may need to be fixed, but what we really need to do is have a conversation about strategic solutions to the crime problem. I continue to assert that we can’t lose sight of the immediate goal of fixing the criminal justice system so bad guys don’t hurt peaceful citizens, and Bernazzani would agree, but he’s also right that we need to get to kids before they start getting involved in violence. We need to engage them in constructive activities, give them an opportunity at a good education, instill in them the virtue of fulfilling their potential, give them hope. As my friend Danna has said, in teaching art to disadvantaged children, we may not be able to promise them the dream world they see on TV, but we can promise them that pride in themselves is only achieved through hard work. The alternative is death.

Many of us are talking about the same thing. We’re on the same page. As citizens, we need to take charge of those institutions that are failing us. We need government to work for us, not against us.

Here’s an example of how citizen activism can work to defeat crime. I got a call last night in a chain call process after an armed robbery Uptown. The action was swift. The police were on the scene in five minutes. When the robbers hit again nearby, a tactical unit swept down on them and caught five perpetrators.

We can work with the police when we demand dialog. Now we need to make sure that those criminals don’t make it back onto the street until they’ve paid the price for their crime, and are reformed. We need to make the judges and D.A. accountable to us, and we need to make sure that incarceration, if that’s the punishment (which I believe it should be) isn’t just a school to train more violent criminals, but a place where real reform and opportunities are created. Yes, those are tough issues, but only citizen involvement will fix the problems our society faces.

Posted in Crime, Eddie Jordan, Katrina Dissidents, New Orleans, Recall Nagin, Worst Mayor Ever | 2 Comments »

The citizens’ revolt continues

Posted by schroeder915 on January 18, 2007

Anytime I write a post about the police chief’s and mayor’s grammar, you know I’m busy. There was much more that I wanted time to write about, and I’ll try to get caught up.

I scanned the radio dial this morning to find out what the redneck wingnut talk show hosts were offering today, and did a double-take when I heard a familiar voice. I’m sitting here now listening the Fox News channel’s lip-smacking convicted insurance commissioner “uh-uh-uh” Jim “smack” Brown’s self-promotion show. He’s interviewing Bart Everson, one week after Bart declared a revolution on the steps of City Hall.

Bart is firing on all cylinders, hitting all the relevant points — if only “uh-uh-uh” Jim “smack” Brown “uh-uh-uh” would shut the eff up (again, we need a true community radio station to broadcast unabridged, free-flowing conversations).

(After the show now) Bart emphasized that he wasn’t advocating for expanded police powers, but Jim Brown cut him off from explaining why — I can relate the story about a friend who was pulled over at a police checkpoint, who may not have been respectful of the police for whatever reason, and who was subsequently issued a traffic ticket — completely illegible because the carbon transfer didn’t work. It’s the second time I’ve heard a story where the citation was illegible — I saw one of those tickets, so I can vouch for their veracity. Unfortunately, traffic stops really do work at catching bad guys, but the rest of us are inconvenienced. Legally, the police have to be careful not to give the appearance of racial profiling, so they’ll issue traffic citations for just about anything. It’s an example of what happens when orders are issued from the lofty heights without surveying the sentiments of residents. The NOPD is making arrests of wanted offenders, but shredding already damaged community relations in the process. We need new thinking. We need more and better dialog to come up with solutions that work, or at least solutions in which the community accepts the tradeoffs — maybe a solution where people who aren’t wanted offenders, and who aren’t driving in a hazardous manner, can be released with a courtesy card instead of a traffic citation. There needs to be a conversation with the community so that we all sign on and understand the consequences.

A Metropolitan Crime Commission poll showed that more than 60 percent of Central City residents don’t feel the police can effectively reduce crime, even though patrols are regularly visible. Bart cited the poll to argue that the police need to be more accountable to communities to solve that problem. For the community policing concept to work, citizens have to be in charge of how policing works for them. There’s a discussion taking place right now at Think New Orleans about creating formal institutions, Citizen Crime Boards, which would require accountability of all of the actors in the criminal justice system to the neighborhoods they serve. If this is a revolution to overthrow incompetent rulers, and to take control of our own destinies, then let’s start with the criminal justice community.

To satisfy his uncontrollable self-aggrandizement, Jim Brown kept interrupting Bart and shifting the conversation, so I felt compelled to call in. Jim Brown dropped the call at first, and I know how fast hosts cut off other speakers, so I felt rushed and couldn’t clearly muster the words I wanted to say. Nevertheless, I got in one good jab at the other participants in the criminal justice system who weren’t mentioned: the judges and District Attorney Eddie Jordan.

I praised Bart’s courage for putting himself in the spotlight to speak out against a broken system even while he’s still mourning a tragic event. I concurred that we need to fix the crime problem, and we need to address all of the forms of violence that are manifested in our society — like denying children a good education, and denying people access to their homes. I said that when the police arrive, it’s already too late. All of the factors which produce criminals are re-manifested by violence perpetrated on the rest of society. We also, however, need to remember that the police are the last line of defense, keeping criminals away from peaceful citizens. Unfortunately, the police are the face of the criminal justice system, and it’s easy to villainize them. Of course, we need to have more and better dialog with the police, but other actors need to participate in the conversation. Police chief Warren Riley answered questions Tuesday night at the NOPD 2nd District community crime meeting (Adrastos has an excellent summary of that event). I said that the judges and D.A. weren’t represented in that conversation, but they need to be. They, too, need to answer to citizens for the broken criminal justice system.

We need to break down the barriers which shelter incompetent and crony-ridden government institutions from citizen anger. We need to create neighborhood entities that foster a dialog, name names, and call into question decisions made by autocratic public officials. Clearly, if there’s anything New Orleans citizens have learned since Hurricane Katrina, it’s that we need to take back control of our government.

Bart closed his interview by reminding listeners that nothing happened after Hurricane Katrina to attack the conditions which breed poverty and crime, despite all of the talk about how our society needs to have a conversation about race and class in our society. This conversation, too, could be hosted by Citizen Crime Boards. The dialog might be spun off into another realm, but Citizen Crime Boards would have the advantage on focusing attention on the end-stream results of the broken social systems which breed violence and return that violence to society by generating criminal behavior.

The local FBI director, Jim Bernazzani, said in an interview yesterday that we have tactical solutions to the crime problem. Those tactical responses to crime may need to be fixed, but what we really need to do is have a conversation about strategic solutions to the crime problem. I continue to assert that we can’t lose sight of the immediate goal of fixing the criminal justice system so bad guys don’t hurt peaceful citizens, and Bernazzani would agree, but he’s also right that we need to get to kids before they start getting involved in violence. We need to engage them in constructive activities, give them an opportunity at a good education, instill in them the virtue of fulfilling their potential, give them hope. As my friend Danna has said, in teaching art to disadvantaged children, we may not be able to promise them the dream world they see on TV, but we can promise them that pride in themselves is only achieved through hard work. The alternative is death.

Many of us are talking about the same thing. We’re on the same page. As citizens, we need to take charge of those institutions that are failing us. We need government to work for us, not against us.

Here’s an example of how citizen activism can work to defeat crime. I got a call last night in a chain call process after an armed robbery Uptown. The action was swift. The police were on the scene in five minutes. When the robbers hit again nearby, a tactical unit swept down on them and caught five perpetrators.

We can work with the police when we demand dialog. Now we need to make sure that those criminals don’t make it back onto the street until they’ve paid the price for their crime, and are reformed. We need to make the judges and D.A. accountable to us, and we need to make sure that incarceration, if that’s the punishment (which I believe it should be) isn’t just a school to train more violent criminals, but a place where real reform and opportunities are created. Yes, those are tough issues, but only citizen involvement will fix the problems our society faces.

Posted in Crime, Eddie Jordan, Katrina Dissidents, New Orleans, Recall Nagin, Worst Mayor Ever | Comments Off on The citizens’ revolt continues

MLK on Iraq and post-K New Orleans

Posted by schroeder915 on January 15, 2007

Were he here today, what would he say about Iraq and New Orleans?

There is at the outset a very obvious and almost facile connection between the war in Vietnam and the struggle I, and others, have been waging in America. A few years ago there was a shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor — both black and white — through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the buildup in Vietnam, and I watched this program broken and eviscerated, as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war, and I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic destructive suction tube. So, I was increasingly compelled to see the war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. …

True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar. It comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring.

Martin Luther King, Jr.
4/4/1967
Clergy and Laity Concerned meeting
Riverside Church in New York City

In solidarity with the needs of public housing residents.

Related:

b.rox — “Every Man a King”

Posted in Affordable Housing, Iraq, Katrina Dissidents, New Orleans, Worst Mayor Ever, Worst President Ever | 6 Comments »

The look of no-C Ray Nagin’s market-based recovery

Posted by schroeder915 on January 15, 2007

foreclose_sm.jpg

Fortunately for those who have to dump their houses on the cheap — before they’re foreclosed — because they couldn’t wait a year and a half for federal assistance, or they lost their jobs, or they couldn’t get out of the trap of paying a mortgage on a house they can’t live in while paying to live somewhere else — well, you know, sometimes the market just doesn’t go your way, man, and as the mayor says, you have to make the right decision — fortunately, for those poor souls, there are good people out there who want to help. One man’s dirt is another man’s gold.

Ahem … of course, since he’s never disclosed what the purpose of that real estate investment venture is, I might be excused for mistaking no-C Ray Nagin as that benificent one who’s now, ironically, finally rescuing people from their flooded homes.

Posted in Katrina Dissidents, Recall Nagin, Worst Mayor Ever | 3 Comments »

The look of no-C Ray Nagin’s market-based recovery

Posted by schroeder915 on January 15, 2007

foreclose_sm.jpg

Fortunately for those who have to dump their houses on the cheap — before they’re foreclosed — because they couldn’t wait a year and a half for federal assistance, or they lost their jobs, or they couldn’t get out of the trap of paying a mortgage on a house they can’t live in while paying to live somewhere else — well, you know, sometimes the market just doesn’t go your way, man, and as the mayor says, you have to make the right decision — fortunately, for those poor souls, there are good people out there who want to help. One man’s dirt is another man’s gold.

Ahem … of course, since he’s never disclosed what the purpose of that real estate investment venture is, I might be excused for mistaking no-C Ray Nagin as that benificent one who’s now, ironically, finally rescuing people from their flooded homes.

Posted in Katrina Dissidents, Recall Nagin, Worst Mayor Ever | Comments Off on The look of no-C Ray Nagin’s market-based recovery