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Archive for the ‘Bush is a moron’ Category

3000 American soldiers now killed in Iraq

Posted by schroeder915 on January 1, 2007

There’s been absolutely zero discussion in the mainstream press about the Bush family vendetta against Saddam Hussein ever since the Iraqi dictator ordered the assassination of George H.W. Bush.

Why did George W. Bush hasten to execute the dictator who his father courted, who his father turned against to regain control of Middle East oil, and who later issued an assassination order against his father.

One needn’t defend Saddam Hussein to question what the cause was that sent 3000 American soldiers to their graves, and wounded another 22,565. What is accepted fact now should have been abundantly clear in 2003: that the United Nations had, in fact, very thoroughly identified and destroyed Saddam’s weapons labs after the first Iraq war; that Iraq was not “the central front” in the war against terrorism; and that occupying Iraq would place American soldiers in the middle of a bloody civil war.

Rather than leave Saddam to rot in an undisclosed prison, at least until U.S. troops leave Iraq, by making Saddam’s gruesome execution public and televised, and burying him in a marked grave, George W. Bush has committed another grave error of judgment. Saddam will be glorified as a martyr, and will continue to inspire opposition to the United States. Saddam’s execution will likely have the same effect as Paul Bremer’s landing in Baghdad, issuing proclamations to, immediately, privatize all Iraqi industries, to disband the decapitated and defeated army, and to fire all professionals who were members of the Baath Party.

Invading a country to settle a personal vendetta, George W. Bush has again shown the mental and emotional development of a two-year-old, obediently served his masters in the oil business, and demonstrated once again that he is the worst president ever!

Posted in Bush is a moron, George W. Bush, Impeach Bush, Iraq, Katrina Dissidents, Worst President Ever | 11 Comments »

Since I’ve been called an elitist …

Posted by schroeder915 on December 7, 2006

I don’t take kindly to being called names, so I’m going to post my response to a recent Gentilly Town Hall discussion right here, front and center (if that link doesn’t work, go to the Gentilly Town Hall forum main page, and look for topic number 1104).

Gentilly Girl, with whom I don’t wish any animosity, nevertheless chose to take me to the mat in response to an earlier PGR post:

He/she asks “Do you think you might like to have some airtime to get the word out about your neighborhood battles?” and ironically above that line questions the motive of the demolition of Cabrini Church. I’m sure the church isn’t located in Schroeder’s neighborhood. The irony of the elite preservationists dictating to an entire neighborhood what they can and cannot do in order to rebuild and recover. So, please log on to his blog and get the word out about YOUR neighborhood.

Since there appears to be a gross misunderstanding about my position, and since the call was made to use my forum to “get the word out,” I shall clarify:

Ah … if you’re talking about how I went into your house to help gut it, well, then yes, I guess you could say I *am* part of the preservationist *elite* — only in so far as there aren’t enough people doing this dirty work. But if you wish to associate me with some sort of conspiracy against your neighborhood, you’re dead wrong. As I’ve stated on your blog, Gentilly Girl, I couldn’t give a hoot what happens to that church. I simply believe that these issues should be given a complete public airing. Were I to resort to name-calling, I might call you and your neighborhood activists destruction elitists for wanting to take possession of a church which is owned by the church parish, not by the Archdiocese. I might call you part of the Catholic elite, or perhaps part of Walter William Maestri’s elite — a select group which makes decisions behind closed doors, and when they don’t get what they want, they become insolent and stomp their feet and cry foul. What really sickens me is what little consideration is given to public hearings on these issues, so that civil dialog, understanding, and hopefully, compromise, can be achieved. What really sickens me is how a Christian institution, the Archdiocese, chooses to pit communities against one another for the sake of a piece of land and a few buildings, rather than to seek harmony among people. All who care about New Orleans as a community, and yes, who care about preservation of its heritage, should care about how these issues are resolved. It’s about *the process*, not my attitude one way or another about *the building*.

Until very recently, the media has weighed heavily in favor of “progress” and the “wreckingballistas.” WWL TV covered the preservationist angle on the 10:00 news last night (I couldn’t find the archived video).

You know what’s really pathetic, and at the core of this battle? The fact that neighborhoods are struggling at all to justify their existence and economic well-being. Where’s the effing leadership in this town? In the United effing States of America?!!

Posted in Bush is a moron, Failure is not an option, Historic Preservation, Ray Nagin, Rebuild New Orleans, Worst President Ever | 4 Comments »

Since I’ve been called an elitist …

Posted by schroeder915 on December 7, 2006

I don’t take kindly to being called names, so I’m going to post my response to a recent Gentilly Town Hall discussion right here, front and center (if that link doesn’t work, go to the Gentilly Town Hall forum main page, and look for topic number 1104).

Gentilly Girl, with whom I don’t wish any animosity, nevertheless chose to take me to the mat in response to an earlier PGR post:

He/she asks “Do you think you might like to have some airtime to get the word out about your neighborhood battles?” and ironically above that line questions the motive of the demolition of Cabrini Church. I’m sure the church isn’t located in Schroeder’s neighborhood. The irony of the elite preservationists dictating to an entire neighborhood what they can and cannot do in order to rebuild and recover. So, please log on to his blog and get the word out about YOUR neighborhood.

Since there appears to be a gross misunderstanding about my position, and since the call was made to use my forum to “get the word out,” I shall clarify:

Ah … if you’re talking about how I went into your house to help gut it, well, then yes, I guess you could say I *am* part of the preservationist *elite* — only in so far as there aren’t enough people doing this dirty work. But if you wish to associate me with some sort of conspiracy against your neighborhood, you’re dead wrong. As I’ve stated on your blog, Gentilly Girl, I couldn’t give a hoot what happens to that church. I simply believe that these issues should be given a complete public airing. Were I to resort to name-calling, I might call you and your neighborhood activists destruction elitists for wanting to take possession of a church which is owned by the church parish, not by the Archdiocese. I might call you part of the Catholic elite, or perhaps part of Walter William Maestri’s elite — a select group which makes decisions behind closed doors, and when they don’t get what they want, they become insolent and stomp their feet and cry foul. What really sickens me is what little consideration is given to public hearings on these issues, so that civil dialog, understanding, and hopefully, compromise, can be achieved. What really sickens me is how a Christian institution, the Archdiocese, chooses to pit communities against one another for the sake of a piece of land and a few buildings, rather than to seek harmony among people. All who care about New Orleans as a community, and yes, who care about preservation of its heritage, should care about how these issues are resolved. It’s about *the process*, not my attitude one way or another about *the building*.

Until very recently, the media has weighed heavily in favor of “progress” and the “wreckingballistas.” WWL TV covered the preservationist angle on the 10:00 news last night (I couldn’t find the archived video).

You know what’s really pathetic, and at the core of this battle? The fact that neighborhoods are struggling at all to justify their existence and economic well-being. Where’s the effing leadership in this town? In the United effing States of America?!!

Posted in Bush is a moron, Failure is not an option, Historic Preservation, Ray Nagin, Rebuild New Orleans, Worst President Ever | Leave a Comment »

Tinky Winky attends economic summit in Hanoi

Posted by schroeder915 on November 20, 2006

ph2006111901007.jpg

“Oh no girl — you wrong fo’ dat!”

I wouldn’t mind really if the preznit wore a three-piece suit, an “ao dai,” pyjamas, or a Teletubbie costume — it would just seem more appropriate for him to spend a little time in a particular American city that could use an economic summit right about now. But just like when he skipped out on service in Vietnam — probably occasionally AWOL in New Orleans — while he was supposed to be doing his draft-dodging duty in the Texas Air National Guard, he never seems to be in the right place at the right time. He should have been in Vietnam in the 70’s, instead he was in New Orleans. Now he should be in New Orleans, when instead, he’s in Vietnam.

I’ll be up in the great white north for the Thanksgiving holiday, but I’ll check in periodically, and I have some New Orleans photos to post this week if I can get an internet connection.

In the meantime, I’ll refer readers to WTUL’s Community Gumbo, which featured a touching interview with a Desire public housing resident, Deborah Davis, and the Stay Local campaign is asking New Orleans residents to commit to making their holiday purchases in local businesses.

Posted in Bush is a moron, Katrina Dissidents, Worst President Ever | 8 Comments »

Kill corporate media

Posted by schroeder915 on November 15, 2006

David Letterman’s monologue on Monday (starts at 2:13):

Tomorrow President Bush is leaving for Vietnam. I guess this time his father couldn’t get him out of it.

Speaking of Vietnam, dangerblond had some thoughts about “staying the course” in a recent post which resonated with my own views:

He was wearing a cap that identified him as a Vietnam War veteran. He was angry and complaining about everything. She was murmuring to him to calm down. Suddenly, he went off on the national election results.

 

“They are going to get more soldiers killed! Just like Kerry did in Vietnam! That bastard!”

 

So, I guess if decorated war veterans like John Kerry had not publicly criticized the war in Vietnam, America could have “stayed the course” over there throughout the 1970s, and fewer soldiers would have been killed?

 

I appreciate this man’s service to our country, and he has the right to believe what he wants, but if people like him had not voted for George W. Bush in 2000, no American soldiers would have lost their lives in Iraq.

 

The other night Josh got on my case because I was slamming Republican senators and congresspeople who support the war and who have fighting-age children partying on daddy’s money instead of wearing the uniform of their country.

 

“Would you want your sons over there?”

 

No, I don’t. But if I really thought Iraq posed a danger to my country, not my country’s petroleum industry, I would be ashamed of my sons if they didn’t volunteer to fight.

I’ve always thought that the discussion shouldn’t be about “staying the course,” but about how many more lives we are willing to sacrifice. That’s right, I said “we,” because each of us, in what we do and say, are either contributing to, or fighting against, the prolonged commitment of American soldiers in Iraq. Each and every one of us has to make a decision about how many more lives and families we are willing to destroy, and to act accordingly in the way we talk about the occupation of Iraq.

Think about the sons and daughters, fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, who will return in body bags, never to see their children fulfilled, never to share in the joys of living with loved ones, never to have the moments of understanding that emerge when we grow old with close companions — 2,859 killed so far. And remember the more than 21,000 American soldiers thus far who will return, but whose bodies and minds have been shattered.

When the average is 65 American soldiers killed per month in Iraq, and assuming an occupation that persists until, let’s say another 24 months, that’s 1,560 more soldiers killed in Iraq — a casualty count that approaches 4,500. Whose names will be on that list?

We, as a nation, made a grave error by allowing George W. Bush and a bunch of other fratboy, draft-dodging, chickenhawk, neocon, corporate cronies to gin up the argument to have the war in Iraq which they wanted long before 9/11.

And now, in pro-administration, pro-Republican forums like WWL 870 AM, and the new Clear Channel Fox News format on 99.5 FM, talk show hosts are choreographing the discussion to “stay the course.” The word choreographing is far too elegant for what are really just a bunch of dumb rednecks spewing their ill-informed, narrow perspectives, while shutting off discussion — people like WWL’s Bob DelGiorno, who on Monday kept repeating the same tired line about “staying the course” while invalidating alternative viewpoints (if callers could even make it past the call screeners), and limiting the discussion to that single, simpleton talking point.

What does “staying the course” mean anymore? People should say what it really means. It really means: Keep Americans bogged down in a quagmire where insurgents are trying to kill them. It’s a quagmire, because as long as Americans are there, people will want to kill them because they’re country is being occupied, and more of them will want to kill us because our government sent them there. I don’t think we could get on top of that situation if we committed every fighting-aged person in America (as well as all the mercenaries we get from other countries who become citizens after serving in the U.S. military). The bigger the American presence there, the more we are resented. As dangerblond said, every single American would fight if an army invaded the United States.

Part of the problem is that we aren’t fighting an army. We aren’t fighting a state. We’re fighting an ideology, and ideologies only become more entrenched and extreme when they’re threatened by force. George W. Bush was absolutely pathetic in his inability to comprehend the nature of the response our nation needed to take to 9/11 attacks — or he and his friends shamelessly exploited the opportunity to get their war in Iraq.

One of the WWL callers on Bob-“aaah”-Del-“aaah”-Giorno’s show said he’d done five-tours in Iraq already — a dubious claim — and said that if we could see the people over there who feel threatened by the chaos, we’d want to continue the war/occupation. I don’t disagree that we owe them their safety (now that George W. Bush and the Republican Congress screwed up so badly), but I do disagree that we can do anything about it — short of evacuating half of the Iraqi population — because we are the problem.

Once people in Washington start admitting that we can’t stay there forever, then decisions can be made about how to get out as gracefully as possible, saving as many lives as possible. But that’s part of the problem. The neocons don’t want to leave Iraq. They want an American presence in Iraq in perpetuity, because the neocon ideology is entirely financed by the oil industry.

In its corporatist nature, and in its exploitation of the idea of individual victimization as a justification for opposing democratic resolution to conflict, it would be no mistake to call the neocon ideology fascist — and that should be the focus of discussion: what are American soldiers dying for? How is the way the debate is framed by the corporate power structure of our nation altering people’s perceptions of what the cause is, and what their personal stake is in the cause?

I’m disheartened by the breakdown in civil dialog in our country, where profit is the driving motive for limiting dialog to the partisan rancor and character assault that arises from the talking points of extreme ideological opponents.

A lot of us don’t realize that our democracy is being poisoned by the corporate stranglehold on media — the principal purveyor of ideas in the public square. If ideas are the oxygen of our democracy, ours is on life support.

Corporate control of ideas is accomplished in a direct manner through editorial decisions made by gatekeepers who decide what the story is; it’s done in a more insidious manner by dumbing down the information we get; and it’s done as a byproduct of the way we’ve structured media ownership in our country to allow for a greater concentration, which limits the number of perspectives presented for us to digest. The sum total effect is the creation of an entire population which lacks the ability to think critically, which is well-versed in the desired talking points, and which is malleable to the corporate power elite’s agenda.

Times-Picayune media reporter Dave Walker is one such tool of corporate media. He apparently lacks the critical thinking required to expose the evils of media ownership concentration. In a recent story, he wrote about Entercom replacing Air America Radio with WWL re-runs, he characterized the Entercom decision as a mere annoyance “irking local lefties still basking in their narrow reclamation of Congress,” as though only “lefties” wanted more accountability in Washington.

Walker failed to adequately describe how the breadth and depth of discussion about issues on the national agenda has been severely diminished by the decision. He failed to talk about how it isn’t good for our democracy, or our communities, when a combined 13 radio stations in New Orleans are owned by Pennsylvania-based Entercom, and Texas-based Clear Channel. He failed to mention that programming changes are made by corporate owners, not based upon the needs of the community, or our democracy, but upon an excessively high rate of return demanded by the corporate media ownership structure of radio.

In his token ceremonial piece, Walker referred to lower Arbitron ratings on WSMB (while hosting the Air America format) compared to WWL. He failed to mention that WWL reaches a wide swath of the southern United States, while WSMB is only heard in New Orleans. He failed to mention the highly questionable validity of Arbitron ratings. He failed to mention the fact that Entercom never promoted the Air America format on WSMB — a critical consideration in a world in which people have been generally so turned off by radio over the years, that they don’t even bother to look for worthwhile content.

Walker mindlessly transcribed Entercom executives’ quotes:

“Because of the storm, it was hard to launch that kind of programming in the marketplace, when so many people were concerned with survival, not philosophy. We think this is a better use of the 1350 frequency at this place and this time.

 

“This is a better choice based on what audiences and advertisers are telling us.”

Walker never asked why, if Entercom thinks New Orleanians can’t handle “philosophy,” they should continue to be subjected to Rush Limbaugh’s rantings on WWL in the prime midday schedule. He never questioned why, if Entercom is so interested in the survival issues of New Orleans residents, it broadcasts 15 hours a week of sports, 20 hours a week of time travel and alien abductions, and 15 hours a week of food talk. He never asked what content Entercom provides on the other three radio stations it owns in New Orleans.

When, on Monday, Clear Channel changed WRNO from a stale rock format, to Fox News and partisan right-wing talk, Walker wrote another dull report, once again providing a non-threatening forum for another media giant to justify its tactics:

The new format’s mission is “to be an activist voice in the improvement of New Orleans,” said Dick Lewis, New Orleans-based regional vice president for Clear Channel.

It took Clear Channel 14 months to figure out that New Orleanians might need more information about how to rebuild their lives and their neighborhoods? And in the end, what are they giving us? Sean Hannity, Bill O’Reilly, convicted insurance commissioner Jim Brown, and Ray Nagin’s key advisor — the Republican most responsible for the amazing disappearing mayor’s re-election — Rob Couhig. Hmm … I wonder if we’ll hear any criticism of the mayor on Couhig’s program.

Wanna know how the new activist station handles true activism? Try calling the station to complain about the addition of yet another partisan format to the radio dial.

I called on Monday to make my comments on air during Andre Trevigne’s debut. She’s another apologist for the Bush administration, but I simply wanted to state that generally, I didn’t think New Orleans needed another right-wing radio station. The girl who answered the phone said that Andre wasn’t talking about programming on her show. I replied that Trevigne should be talking about programming, because, at the very least, the decision to move to talk radio, ostensibly to give New Orleanians another forum for recovery information, was belated, and at worst, disingenuous. Once again, if Clear Channel were so interested in serving the New Orleans community, why dump Sean Hannity and Bill O’Reilly on us? The phone girl explained that Andre Tevigne doesn’t make the programming decisions. She just works there. I replied that Andre Trevigne, and everyone else who works at a Clear Channel station, has made a choice to support the programming decisions by working there. The girl sounded troubled. She sounded like she might be, for the first time, questioning her decision to work for Clear Channel, and then offered me another phone number I could call to comment on the programming change.

Here’s that number: 679-7300. Ask for Mike Cramer. I doubt he’ll answer. I haven’t gotten through to anyone at Entercom or Clear Channel who cared to talk about programming decisions. But leave Mike a message, and tell him what you think of Clear Channel’s decision to create another forum for right-wing partisan lies.

Later, I called the FCC to see if there was anyone there I could talk to. The woman who answered said I had to make a complaint in writing. I’ve been able to phone in complaints before, but apparently, that was during the Clinton administration — before the federal government became an ideological fortress against criticism.

The FCC woman did engage me in a discussion, only to tell me that the FCC doesn’t govern programming decisions. I stated that my complaint wasn’t simply about programming decisions, but the fact that Clear Channel and Entercom aren’t using their New Orleans licenses responsibly, making programming decisions that don’t reflect the needs of the New Orleans community. The woman told me that she couldn’t state her opinion about ownership matters, but again told me that the FCC doesn’t rule on programming matters. I replied that my complaint centered on programming precisely because it is executives of corporate media companies making the decisions about what we in New Orleans should have to listen to. I said it was reprehensible what the FCC was allowing to happen here in New Orleans, and elsewhere around the country. Again, a pause, as the woman silently acknowledged that a wrong was being committed. And then she started to navigate through the FCC Web site so she could give me addresses where I could file my complaint.

If you want to call the FCC, don’t wade through the menu of options. Just dial “0” when you get dumped into the menu: 888-225-5322.

In coming days, I’ll be writing (and posting) formal letters of complaint to the FCC, and sending copies to Entercom and Clear Channel. And in an upcoming post, I’ll be writing about how the ratings game played by corporate executives has parsed up the population of listeners over the years into an ever diminishing pool, as bad programming leads to fewer and fewer listeners, and more segmentation of bad listeners leads to worse and worse programming.

I know a lot of people are turned off by radio. So am I. I know that what was once a public medium has been so polluted by corporate control over the years that it is toxic to the ears of many people who have turned instead to satellite radio and iPods.

It ain’t bad everywhere though, folks. There are models for success in other parts of the country where ownership is still independent and community-based. I believe we can create media that responds to the needs and desires of our communities, and our democracy. But we have to participate in the debate for that to happen.

Don’t kill your radio. Kill the system that makes your radio a weapon of the opposition.

Posted in Bush is a moron, Clear Channel, Democracy, Entercom, George W. Bush, Hurricane Katrina, Impeach Bush, Iraq, Katrina Dissidents, Media, Media Democracy, New Orleans, Radio, Ray Nagin, Rebuild New Orleans, Worst President Ever, WRNO, WSMB, WWL, WWWL | 19 Comments »

“Don’t let Mark Foley pat your ass on the way out!”

Posted by schroeder915 on November 8, 2006

Na na na na, na na na na, hey hey, goodbye!

Good riddance to the Republican Party devolution.

Overnight, I feel like my country came back to me. I feel like an American again!

Despite Republican dirty tricks, push polling, negative ads, hassling Democratic households with telemarketing calls, intimidation, and voter fraud, American voters prevailed.

The Democrats needed 15 seats to win control of the House. They got 26!

The Senate is still up for grabs, pending likely recounts, but right now it looks like the Democrats will get enough seats to take control of the Senate as well. Democratic candidates in Virginia and Montana came out ahead overnight as strongly Democratic precinct counts were tallied, giving the Democrats the 6 seats they needed. It’s a vindication of Howard Dean’s 50-state strategy.

gr2006110800356.gif

SOURCES: Associated Press, Congressional Quarterly | GRAPHIC: The Washington Post – November 8, 2006

What is this? It’s like 1986 all over again. We have a Democratic Congress, a delusional president, and Daniel Ortega is running Nicaragua again!

Here’s what I want on the agenda:

  • Coastal restoration in Louisiana.
  • Category 5 storm protection.
  • The United States spends more in a month in Iraq than it’s allocated for relief to homeowners in Louisiana. More money is has gone missing to contractors in Iraq than has been spent for relief to homeowners. The money still isn’t getting into the hands of the more than 200,000 New Orleanians left homeless for 14 months. We should do better than that.
  • A serious strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions in the next decade.
  • A serious Congressional investigation into the lies of the Bush administration to pursue war in Iraq.
  • Require the Bush administration to deliver an Iraq exit strategy.
  • The Fairness Doctrine restored, and an FCC that requires commercial stations to serve local communities better.

Thank you Stephanie Miller for the post title.

Update:

I should note that many kittens were saved as well last night! 😉

 

And now, as Donald Rumsfeld cleans out his desk, he can certainly be sure that “there are known knowns; there are things we know we know.” Just as surely he can now also say, while looking for a new job, that “we also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don’t know we don’t know.”

 

Rumsfeld should have been fired a long time ago, right about the time he passed blame onto the military for his own failure to get armor to troops by saying, “as you know, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time.” Unfortunately, it shouldn’t have taken the worst president ever the loss of his party’s control of Congress to learn that he shouldn’t have gone to war in Iraq with the Secretary of Defense he had, but should have listened to the generals, the critics, the real intelligence … his father.

 

If he had listened to those other perspectives, he’d have known that he shouldn’t have gone to war in Iraq at all. If there’s any lesson George W. Bush should now have learned (and hopefully we as a nation have learned), it’s that critics might actually know what they’re talking about. Those who aren’t willing to listen to criticism, are inevitably going to make mistakes. In this case of Iraq, with more than 2800 American soldiers killed, and more than 21,000 injured, the mistake couldn’t have been more costly.

 

Maybe Rumsfeld can start a new career as the poet laureate.

Posted in Bill Jefferson, Bush is a moron, Failure is not an option, George W. Bush, Government Corruption, Hurricane Katrina, Impeach Bush, Iraq, Katrina Dissidents, Media, Media Democracy, New Orleans, Political Campaigns, Political Corruption, Rebuild New Orleans, United States Congress, Worst President Ever | 14 Comments »

“Don’t let Mark Foley pat your ass on the way out!”

Posted by schroeder915 on November 8, 2006

Na na na na, na na na na, hey hey, goodbye!

Good riddance to the Republican Party devolution.

Overnight, I feel like my country came back to me. I feel like an American again!

Despite Republican dirty tricks, push polling, negative ads, hassling Democratic households with telemarketing calls, intimidation, and voter fraud, American voters prevailed.

The Democrats needed 15 seats to win control of the House. They got 26!

The Senate is still up for grabs, pending likely recounts, but right now it looks like the Democrats will get enough seats to take control of the Senate as well. Democratic candidates in Virginia and Montana came out ahead overnight as strongly Democratic precinct counts were tallied, giving the Democrats the 6 seats they needed. It’s a vindication of Howard Dean’s 50-state strategy.

gr2006110800356.gif

SOURCES: Associated Press, Congressional Quarterly | GRAPHIC: The Washington Post – November 8, 2006

What is this? It’s like 1986 all over again. We have a Democratic Congress, a delusional president, and Daniel Ortega is running Nicaragua again!

Here’s what I want on the agenda:

  • Coastal restoration in Louisiana.
  • Category 5 storm protection.
  • The United States spends more in a month in Iraq than it’s allocated for relief to homeowners in Louisiana. More money is has gone missing to contractors in Iraq than has been spent for relief to homeowners. The money still isn’t getting into the hands of the more than 200,000 New Orleanians left homeless for 14 months. We should do better than that.
  • A serious strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions in the next decade.
  • A serious Congressional investigation into the lies of the Bush administration to pursue war in Iraq.
  • Require the Bush administration to deliver an Iraq exit strategy.
  • The Fairness Doctrine restored, and an FCC that requires commercial stations to serve local communities better.

Thank you Stephanie Miller for the post title.

Update:

I should note that many kittens were saved as well last night! 😉

 

And now, as Donald Rumsfeld cleans out his desk, he can certainly be sure that “there are known knowns; there are things we know we know.” Just as surely he can now also say, while looking for a new job, that “we also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don’t know we don’t know.”

 

Rumsfeld should have been fired a long time ago, right about the time he passed blame onto the military for his own failure to get armor to troops by saying, “as you know, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time.” Unfortunately, it shouldn’t have taken the worst president ever the loss of his party’s control of Congress to learn that he shouldn’t have gone to war in Iraq with the Secretary of Defense he had, but should have listened to the generals, the critics, the real intelligence … his father.

 

If he had listened to those other perspectives, he’d have known that he shouldn’t have gone to war in Iraq at all. If there’s any lesson George W. Bush should now have learned (and hopefully we as a nation have learned), it’s that critics might actually know what they’re talking about. Those who aren’t willing to listen to criticism, are inevitably going to make mistakes. In this case of Iraq, with more than 2800 American soldiers killed, and more than 21,000 injured, the mistake couldn’t have been more costly.

 

Maybe Rumsfeld can start a new career as the poet laureate.

Posted in Bill Jefferson, Bush is a moron, Failure is not an option, George W. Bush, Government Corruption, Hurricane Katrina, Impeach Bush, Iraq, Katrina Dissidents, Media, Media Democracy, New Orleans, Political Campaigns, Political Corruption, Rebuild New Orleans, United States Congress, Worst President Ever | Leave a Comment »

John Kerry is a two-time loser

Posted by schroeder915 on November 3, 2006

sparethekittens3×4.jpg

John Kerry is a two-time loser for not fighting back against the right-wing lie machine now, and in 2004. He withers under pressure. I wholeheartedly support his views, but he doesn’t display conviction defending his views, his record, and his personal integrity.

So go away John Kerry. It’s people like you who have the spotlight that make it even harder for people like us in the trenches to fight the right-wing fascist takeover of our government. This November 7th may be one of the most important elections in history to change the direction our country is headed under the Bush Republican corporate war machine, corporate-welfare state. This is not the time for lily-livered withering flowers.

Yes, you bravely volunteered for service in Vietnam, but where was your anger when you were attacked by “Swift Boat” lies about your record of service? George W. Bush got his daddy to send him to the Mexico border to fly planes in the Air National Guard — while you and other brave soldiers did their duty for, yes, it must be said, a damned cause — but partying was more fun for George than duty.

Yes Mr. Kerry, it’s true that George W. Bush is a total idiot, but why don’t you say what you mean instead of spinelessly posting a retraction on your Web site? Whether you meant to say that Bush is an idiot whose policies have cost the lives of over 2800 American soldiers, over 21,000 wounded, and scores of thousands of Iraqis, or you meant to say that the military opportunistically recruits kids flunking out of school, you could have defended what you meant more forcefully.

We wouldn’t be having this discussion about Kerry if the right-wing hypocritical religious right didn’t have a stranglehold on our government and our media — thanks to the opportunistic “family values” Republican Party. But thank you Mark Foley and Ted Haggard for showing the world that “family values” was a mere tool to distract your supporters so you could pursue your own tawdry thrills, molesting minors and paying for sex with prostitutes while hypocritically opposing civil unions, stem cell research, and reproductive choice.

Finally, let’s bring attention to the fact that the media is responsible for engaging us in much of this ridiculous chatter at a time when we — every American — should be dedicated to the fight of saving lives in Iraq and on the Gulf Coast, to the fight of stopping global warming and conserving energy, to the fight of saving our nation from financial bankruptcy to China, to the fight for scientific progress, and much, much more that Bush administration and the Republican Congress have bungled.

There was a time before Sean Hannity, Bill O’Reilly, and Rush Limbaugh, when the Fairness Doctrine required broadcasters to offer air time for opposing views. That served as a brake on ridiculous right-wing lies.

We need the Fairness Doctrine restored. Our democracy, our choices, and our nation’s destiny, are not served well when major media organizations are for one party or another, rather than providing intelligent discussion of critical issues.

We should also keep in mind how much money media corporations earn from the back-and-forth accusations from extreme political corners, when most of America is in the middle somewhere. In addition to restoring the Fairness Doctrine, we should require media corporations to allow free political speech on our air waves, and on our regulated cable monopolies.

Vote this coming Tuesday, November 7th. Vote Democratic. When we citizens take back the House and Senate from the morally repugnant, politically corrupt, Republican Party, then we can start to fix the problems our nation confronts.

Posted in Bush, Bush is a moron, Democracy, Failure is not an option, George W. Bush, Hurricane Katrina, Impeach Bush, Iraq, Katrina, Katrina Dissidents, Media, New Orleans, Political Campaigns, Political Corruption | 40 Comments »